Download PDF by Shahnaz Khan: Aversion and Desire: Negotiating Muslim Female Identity in

By Shahnaz Khan

ISBN-10: 0889614008

ISBN-13: 9780889614000

ISBN-10: 1417584416

ISBN-13: 9781417584413

Shahnaz Khan offers the voices of Muslim girls on how they build and maintain their Islamic id. Khan interviewed fourteen Muslim ladies approximately their feel of energy, authenticity and position. Her serious research demanding situations the Western notion of Islam as monolithic and static.

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Aversion and Desire: Negotiating Muslim Female Identity in by Shahnaz Khan PDF

Shahnaz Khan provides the voices of Muslim ladies on how they build and maintain their Islamic id. Khan interviewed fourteen Muslim girls approximately their experience of strength, authenticity and position. Her severe research demanding situations the Western conception of Islam as monolithic and static.

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Extra info for Aversion and Desire: Negotiating Muslim Female Identity in the Diaspora

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Modernists ar- Negotiating the Third Space / 7 gued that ijtehad had been used in the past in pre-colonial Muslim societies and could be used again so that reform would proceed within an Islamic frame. A major problem with modernist vision of reform was its dismissal of the structural effects of colonialism not only during colonization but also long after the former colonies had achieved political independence. Although modernists were concerned with getting their message across to the people whose conditions their reforms were to affect, they were also interested in challenging the arguments of European Orientalists and in reaching European readers (Davis 1987).

My criteria included women who had been born into Muslim families as well as those who identified themselves as Muslim. Although originally from different countries, they all currently live in the Toronto area. To find my subjects, I asked friends, colleagues, and women's groups to ask suitable individuals to contact me if they were willing to talk about what their experiences of being Muslim and female in Canada mean. I suspect that those who referred these women to me had discussed with the nominees something about Muslim identity and whether they wanted to raise questions about the issue or just talk about it.

This connection reinforces their central position as woman in the struggles for social, political, and moral order in their "home" countries. Notion of woman is also central in helping define the struggles and boundaries of minority communities in the West. All this is occurring in a context where increasingly Orientalism and Islamistinfluenced notions of Umma define polarizing influences on women's lives. Thus, issues that women are demanding become the concern of the nation or the community. These issues are then prioritized behind those of achieving a "correct" ideology and morality.

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Aversion and Desire: Negotiating Muslim Female Identity in the Diaspora by Shahnaz Khan


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